Our website uses cookies. We use cookies to remember settings and to help provide you with the best experience we can. We also use cookies to continuously improve our website by compiling visitor statistics. Read more about cookies

default.prinses_maxima_centrum

Pontine gliomas

A DIPG or pons glioma is a high-grade glioma. This diffuse, intrinsic brain stem tumor is located in the pons, a part of the brain stem. Every year, approximately 10 children in the Netherlands are diagnosed with DIPG.

The brochure entitled High-grade glioma contains comprehensive information about this disease. The most important information is provided below.


Causes 

Gliomas are caused by a developmental error in one of the progenitor cells of the supporting cells. Probably something is damaged in the chromosomes or in the DNA of this cell. It is unclear as to what exactly causes gliomas. Sometimes they are caused by a genetic disorder, causing the frequent occurrence of (brain) tumors in a family.

Symptoms

Children with a pons glioma might have a crooked face, be cross-eyed, have double vision and difficulty speaking and/or swallowing. Sometimes they cannot move an arm or leg properly. Increased pressure in the brain can cause headaches and vomiting, balance problems, an unsteady gait and tripping over their own feet.

How is DIPG diagnosed?

An MRI scan is performed and cerebrospinal fluid is drawn under sedation. Sometimes a piece of tissue is removed (biopsy) to obtain information about the tumor cells.

Treatment

There is currently no curative treatment for DIPG. To reduce the symptoms, children with DIPG receive radiotherapy and medication. Some children can participate in a study (clinical trial) to determine the efficacy of a new drug or treatment.

Chance of recovery

We are currently unable to cure children with DIPG. The life expectancy of most children with this disease is short.

Questions?

Children and adolescents with DIPG are treated in the neuro-oncology department.